peace

Rie fu's UK Debut Album

In relocating from her native homeland to the leafy landscapes of her adopted home in Surrey, Japanese artist Rie fu (pronounced ree-ay) has followed her creative muse to connect both cultures using a unique approach that’s richly reflected in her poignant, beautiful and observational album, ‘Places’.

While communicating an honest exposition of her lifestyle, featuring authentic birdsong and the sound of rain on branches delicately interpret a harmony that’s both organic and in tune with nature. Thematically, tracks such as ‘Again’ (a song about commuting on the M25) and ‘Mirror’ reflect the irony of British rituals as seen from a foreigner’s perspective.
‘Places’ is the delightful result, and completes her shift from electronic to a more observational and spiritual sound. Right down to its self-painted cover art, Rie’s music is the perfect combination of music, art and nature.

‘Places’ – released on 15th March, features Rie on lead vocals, acoustic guitar and the delicate piano that creates the spine of the album, which is produced by Dan Cox at Urchin Studios - who has recorded many unique voices such as Laura Marling, Florence Welch, and Thurston Moore.

In relocating from her native homeland to the leafy landscapes of her adopted home in Surrey, Japanese artist Rie fu (pronounced ree-ay) has followed her creative muse to connect both cultures using a unique approach that’s richly reflected in her poignant, beautiful and observational album, ‘Places’.

While communicating an honest exposition of her lifestyle, featuring authentic birdsong and the sound of rain on branches delicately interpret a harmony that’s both organic and in tune with nature. Thematically, tracks such as ‘Again’ (a song about commuting on the M25) and ‘Mirror’ reflect the irony of British rituals as seen from a foreigner’s perspective.
‘Places’ is the delightful result, and completes her shift from electronic to a more observational and spiritual sound. Right down to its self-painted cover art, Rie’s music is the perfect combination of music, art and nature.

‘Places’ – released on 15th March, features Rie on lead vocals, acoustic guitar and the delicate piano that creates the spine of the album, which is produced by Dan Cox at Urchin Studios - who has recorded many unique voices such as Laura Marling, Florence Welch, and Thurston Moore.

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Now on sale
Dec 19 2019
£ 20.00
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12” Black vinyl (33 rpm)
~£ 6.99 Shipping to United States
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Project DetailsPLACES

Format
12” Black vinyl (33 rpm)
Caution: Vinyl mockups and specs may differ from the final product. Qrates is not responsible if the final product does not match expectations.
Sell catalog project
This is a Sell Catalog project which you can purchase the artist's stock. Your order will be shipped from the artist's delivery base after your order has been processed.
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Project duration
Retail release date: Dec 19 2019
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Shipping fee to United States: £ 6.99 ~
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Rié fu is a singer-songwriter of rare melodic grace whose music resonates with the lush splendour of Karen Carpenter and the acoustic intimacy of Suzanne Vega. But there are signs in her sound of an artist teetering on the edge between MOR and the avant-garde.
She came to music via painting, having studied Fine Art at London’s Central Saint Martin’s, she started releasing her first music when she was 19 under the artist name Rie fu . Since then, she has released a long-player of self-penned material almost every year – and in 2015 she toured around Asia.

Now she is releasing new tracks - paying homage to Japan and to the UK - that prove she is entering her most intriguing phase to date.

A Rié song might be about anything - she even has one about eyelash extensions - but these are merely the launchpad for a series of thrillingly inventive meditations on the human condition.
“There’s nothing I wouldn’t write about,” she says. “I’d welcome the challenge of writing about the most unexpected thing. ”
“Japanese poetry and writing are all about saying something through something else, implying obliquely,” she muses.
“In a Japanese poem, if something is beautiful, you never use the word ‘beautiful’; you refer to it without spelling it out.”

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